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Artur Eresko | About rescue of sicken

Artur Eresko | About rescue of sicken

In Latvia the debates on the introduction of a compulsory health insurance system gain in force. The following model is offered: the state insures children, pensioners and needy residents, but the

jobholders pay individually. The value in dispute is 25 euro a month or 300 euro a year.

 

In light of misery of the “free” medicine, which suffers from chronic inadequate funding, the way-out is seen in the introduction of a compulsory health insurance system.

A compulsory health insurance system, unlike a public health system, would facilitate competition in the sector itself, which would allow application the existing funding more effectively. Taxes in Latvia at the moment are rather high already, and raising them to fund the health - care system would just undermine the tenets of this system itself.

A compulsory health insurance system means the following order:

— the jobholders buy an insurance policy from a private company,

— such company, in its turn, concludes a service agreement with a health facility.

But the state insures such categories of residents like children, pensioners, needy people, explain experts.

To introduce a compulsory health insurance system a legal regulation, which is not available currently, is required. It is also important that the system would include all social groups rather than a few percent of wealthy residents of the country. Otherwise, the system would not be effective.

Besides, it is important to find out how much, in fact, the health care services cost in Latvia. It is estimated that if all employable residents buy a health insurance policy for 300 euro a year or 25 euro a month, funding of the health-care sector would increase by 292.8 million up to 330.8 million euro.

Approximately such amount is exactly missing to keep the Latvian public health afloat.

Such health insurance system exists in Holland. One difference is that 300 euro a year is quite a reasonable burden for a Middle Dutch. While for 20-25 percent of the Latvian residents such amount is commensurable with monthly income.

For comparison: in Holland the average pay makes up 2800 euro a month, but in Latvia - 633 euro. But monthly income of too many Latvians falls short of the average pay in fact…

 

Candidate of Economic and Legal Sciences Eresko Artur (Ересько Артур).